• Another brilliant video!

    I do think the future is bright for handmade/crafts. Take southern Europe, for instance: I’m in Portugal and that aesthectics has started not too long so people are not saturated at all.

    Yay for the handmade look!

  • @Concha I have an exhibition in Portugal – Porto, ‘Invasion’ Gallery Dama Aflita, opens May 23rd. Come along and bring everyone you know!

    Another good vid Erin – nice one.

  • Great topic, I dunno, I think that with the internet and such it’s becoming easier to distribute you art and get to know people, maybe the down side is that there’s so much that it often takes a while to get to the good stuff and some other things … I think the future is bright for art and creative people, I don’t really know in what direction it will go, but I think the access to ever growing mediums and challenges will make people want to do innovative things and probably others will want to go back to what they know and what they feel is safe. So great topic, but also kinda hard to make a real statement about it, because it is the future, no one really knows what will be thrown on our path … x

  • if enough people take on the optimistic outlook in this video we might just get out of this economic mess. just the thought makes me feel better this rainy monday.

  • So great….I love hearing all of these great artists opinions.. I for one think that the handmade movement will continue to be integral in how we all look at art and design. Maybe it will ebb and flow but, I don’t think it will ever stop being incredibly important. I think it will grow and grow in influence and recognition. Thanks for this guys….
    xo
    Melissa

  • Man I hope that things don’t go back to sleek computer like stuff, but I have a feeling it will. Craig mentions airbrush coming back. Haha that sounds cool to me.

  • This is very thought-provoking.

    The handmade/crafty is often replicated now by machine–I was in Claire’s Accessories the other day (I know, I know) and there were a whole series of silver and bronze brooches with illustration-style owls and little birds. I didn’t know what to think of it.

  • Hard to predicate much these days, but I agree with some of what the video (and Melissa above) touched on with the ebb & flow of styles. I think materialism will be scaled back and practicality put back in the forefront, so multi-tasking pieces will continue to gain popularity. I think some of the best design incorporates what is essential and then does something bizarre to create a wabi-sabi perfection.

    And tough call over what’s better, Erin –the video or that ikat scarf you’re rocking! ;)

  • Hard to predicate much these days, but I agree with some of what the video (and Melissa above) touched on with the ebb & flow of styles. I think materialism will be scaled back and practicality put back in the forefront, so multi-tasking pieces will continue to gain popularity. I think some of the best design incorporates what is essential and then does something bizarre to create a wabi-sabi perfection.

    And tough call over what’s better, Erin –the video or that ikat scarf you’re rocking! ;)

  • Great Dialogue, so good to hear an Aussie accent in there! I agree with Craig Atkinson to an extent – there are definitely cycles (usually between 7 and 10 years) that are often defined by economic circumstances…in current ‘tough times’, we’re likely to see a lot of design innovation and ingenuity that tends to be the hallmark of tighter budgets and a more discerning public. The use of computers and more ‘hard edged’ looks however, I’m not too sure about. As there’s a tendency for people to both DIY and embrace a nesting mindset, I suspect handmade and crafts will continue to prosper, however once our economies bounce back, perhaps the sleek aesthetic will be something of a luxury that will return in time too.

  • I’ve only just discovered you and am loving your videos. The enthusiasm is infectious. Thank you for making my day.

    Best wishes from Wales.

Comments are closed.